Buddhism CURED her of 30+ years of apparent Severe Crohn’s Disease

MAW PPP January 28 2013

This is my RESPONSE to a woman in Australia, Kit Campbell, who claims Practicing Buddhism CURED her of 30+ years of apparent Severe Crohn’s Disease. This is the link for her article. Below is my Response just in case they don’t publish it.

July 20, 2013

Dear Kit:

Congratulations on apparently “curing” your Crohn’s Disease. From a humanistic perspective, I am truly happy for you since I have had Severe Obstructional Crohn’s Disease for thirty (30) years and I know how pervasive, painful, expensive and disruptive Crohn’s Disease and its autoimmune effects can be to one’s life and lifestyle. But I am a bit concerned by your stated (and promoted) belief that your cure for Crohn’s Disease is attributed simply to your devoted religious practice of Buddhism. If that is what made you feel better, that’s wonderful FOR YOU. However, preaching the practice of religion as a cure to such a potentially disabling and mysterious disease like Crohn’s Disease is patently irresponsible and insults the millions of struggling patients around the world who suffer from it and ironically pray every day of their lives for relief from Crohn’s Disease, better treatments or a cure.

As you know, Crohn’s Disease is a “broad-spectrum disease” so readers have no idea how badly you were relatively affected by your Crohn’s and thus there also lacks a background context for your medical and religious claims. For example, I have endured over twenty (20) abdominal surgeries and approximately two hundred (200) hospitalizations as a direct result of my Crohn’s yet my sister, who also has Crohn’s, has never even been hospitalized. Additionally, I, like many others, suffer, or have suffered, substantially from side effects of the numerous medications I take/took for Crohn’s Disease like Remicade, Humira, Cimzia, Prednisone, Imuran, 6MP, etc. This “double-whammy” of the treatment often being worse than the disease is a brutal characteristic of Crohn’s Disease which makes it especially difficult to manage on a chronic basis. Does Buddhism work just as well as a cure on these types of Crohn’s patients?

Anyone with Crohn’s Disease who reads your article or book will be happy for you because they generally know how much you’ve suffered based on your written representations. They may even learn a thing or two about a possible mind-body connection and how it can be used to HELP with possibly minimizing some effects of Crohn’s Disease. But claiming religion as a cure to a genetic incurable autoimmune disease is no more of a credible medical claim than representing that fans of certain soccer or football teams are better suited to being cured of Crohn’s Disease simply because of their allegiance to one specific team over another. I am not poking fun at how your religious cure has worked for YOU but I am mocking how insensitive such a claim is when applied to a mass amount of people with a disease like Crohn’s which even the most experienced and knowledgeable of doctors are still so far away from effectively and safely treating – not to mention curing. But I wish you continued PERSONAL success with your apparent effective approach to treating Crohn’s Disease. Please just distinguish your more wide-sweeping Crohn’s Disease Cure claims from your PERSONAL religious practices. Thank you.

Michael A. Weiss, Founder
Crohn’s Disease Warrior Patrol

leave a  comment  BUTTON

3 Responses to Buddhism CURED her of 30+ years of apparent Severe Crohn’s Disease

  1. Michael, I feel that I must comment on your response to Kit’s blog post.

    I read your article and then I read Kit Campbell’s and no where does she say that “her cure for Crohn’s Disease is attributed simply to your devoted religious practice of Buddhism”

    What Kit does say is “The catalyst for me was Buddhism….which gave her the ability to be free from years of pain and suffering. From this she understood that by changing her way of thinking, this in turn changed her way of being. She also states that she found boundaries of Buddhism and began her own quest for more and along with Buddhism she self-studied neuroscience, cell biology, epigenetics, quantum physics and philosophy.

    What she learned was “how we ‘think’ creates chemical reactions in the body. This in turn affects and can damage the cells within us. With no stress, the immune system works extremely well. By practicing acceptance, which prevents all stress, I got through breast cancer, skin cancer, and both my brothers dying of cancer. With each of these tests, the so-called incurable Crohn’s disease never returned.”

    The area of mind-body research is not new and research is finding a positive affect in reducing or better managing symptoms through incorporating the tools needed to better manage disease. One study found that Mind-body therapy may improve quality of life in patients with UC in remission. You can read more about this here http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/86318

    No where does Kit talk about “curing” herself.

    You also state preaching ” the practice of religion as a cure to such a potentially disabling and mysterious disease like Crohn’s Disease is patently irresponsible and insults the millions of struggling patients around the world who suffer from it and ironically pray every day of their lives for relief from Crohn’s Disease, better treatments or a cure.”

    I am curious why you feel this irresponsible? No where in this article does Kit state that there is only religion to cure Crohn’s disease. It was an enlightened path that Kit was on and because she has found relief from her disease much like you, in your social media presence want to help others.

    Perhaps the question to ask is what other steps did she take to bring relief from her symptoms before she entered into Buddhism and then later wanting to learn all she could for cell biology, epigenetics, quantum physics and philosophy and how this relates to the perception of disease.

    I agree with you that Crohn’s Disease is a “broad-spectrum disease” and each person’s expression of this disease is unique. However you continue your argument with

    “readers have no idea how badly you were relatively affected by your Crohn’s and thus there also lacks a background context for your medical and religious claims.”

    In Kit’s first couple of paragraphs she states

    ” three months old I had constantly suffered from stomach problems and was going in and out of doctor’s surgeries. At 13 years of age, after my first severe bleeding attack from the bowel, the symptoms were finally diagnosed as Crohn’s disease.
    Then 30 years of suffering followed with a badly ulcerated bowel, partial bowel removals, resections and constant medications which then affected other organs in my body..”

    Kit clearly states what she has been through. I am sure if you were to read her book there would be a full story of what she went through.

    I know as a past sufferer of Crohn’s (20+ years with multiple surgeries, obstructions, resections, abscesses and other complications as well as cervical cancer and so on) who also no longer has Crohn’s disease, this pretty well sums up without the agonizing details what Kit has been through.

    Michael, you have made quite clear that Crohn’s disease is a “broad-spectrum disease” and each person’s expression of this disease is unique. So is there management and cure, remission or reversal. What works for one may not work for another. This is why we need stories such as this for the inspiration to know that there is hope out there.

    Kit’s story is yet another example of what is possible and may have the ability for others to connect with and find their own “AHA” moment that sparks their own journey to wellness from the symptoms of Crohn’s disease. And, this much like Kit’s story could be the catalyst for someone else.

    Like you said Michael, “there are mass amounts of people with Crohn’s disease which even the most experienced and knowledgeable of doctors are still so far away from effectively and safely treating – not to mention curing.”

    What I would like to entertain is the fact that the medical profession is not trained in religion, alternative modalities or nutrition. They only know how to take care of symptoms with the studies presented to them from pharmaceutical companies (and some of these are quite corrupt) who are not in the business of curing.

    What is wonderful is that the integrative bridge to allopathic and alternative medicine will soon reach both shores. If anything the USA is catching up with the rest of the world.

    I truly believe that it is in Kit’s best interest to get her word out to as many people as possible because we are seeing more toxic drugs, more surgeries, more pain and more suffering with little relief in site. You as well I know that this is what you see over-and-over in the IBD forums and chat groups.

    It seems the more toxic the drugs become to some what manage symptoms of Crohn’s the more we need to embrace other ways of managing this disease that are not considered orthodox by the medical profession.

    I no longer suffer with Crohn’s disease and have my own diagnoses of “no evidence of Crohn’s disease” because I decided to do much what Kit did. I decided to explore outside of the medical profession (not shutting them out completely) and see what was out there. I used nutrition and diet to get to a place of stability and then I too began to self study in the world of religion, spiritualism, cell biology, epigenetics, quantum physics and philosophy.

    I too found my “AHA” moment and knew the moment I no longer needed Crohn’s disease in my life and, a colonoscopy and pathology report confirmed this on paper with a diagnoses of “no evidence of Crohn’s disease.” Not “remission” or “cure” but “no evidence.”

    The medical profession will say “incurable” because that is the scope of their education, and there is nothing wrong with that. This belief system does not have the right to radiate into other modalities of which most have no understanding of.

    These types of modalities were used by doctors long before the pharmaceutical companies started making drugs that ultimately shifted the The Hippocratic Oath of taking clinical case-histories and looking for underlying cause to what we see today; “here take this drug for the symptoms; and yes there are serious side effects which can also damage your health, but you will need to take these for the rest of your life and live a less of a quality of life.”

    I am happy the medical profession is there and we do need it, we are just not using it the way it was intended to be used. If anything we are manipulated and abuse the very structure which is evident in a crumbling health care system in the USA.

    So please allow me to be irresponsible for here just a moment; if you have spent 30 years of your life in-and-out of hospitals, take copious amounts of drugs, have had several surgeries, organs cut out and you are still suffering, and living a diminished life; it may be time to start your own journey to see what has worked for others.

    Listen to what others have to say who have been through pain and suffering and then allow that to spark your own self discovery to healing from the incurable.

    If there is one thing I have learned is this when the medical profession says “incurable” it means it is outside their scope of practice. What it that means to me and others who have done it is “curable is within.”

    Thank you Michael for sharing this story because now I have another person to reach out to and learn her story. I am off to purchase her book and see how I can learn from this as well as give another perspective to my clients who are also searching for their remission, cure or better management of their symptoms of Crohn’s, IBD or IBS.

  2. July 22, 2013

    Karen:

    Thank you for taking the time to read my response and to compose such a thoughtful retort to my opinion. Over the past few years, I have developed a great deal of respect for your opinions with respect to Health and Wellness through our communications on various health care social media platforms. That said, I agree with your main point that identifying and sharing successful alternative treatments to “incurable” diseases, labeled as such by the mainstream, is a GREAT byproduct of stories shared like the one by the woman in Australia who claims Buddhism ignited a thought process which made her “finally underst[and] that by changing my way of thinking, this in turn changed my way of being.”

    But I respectfully disagree with your overall assessment that showcasing such a story in a relatively high-profile global medium is good for the millions of struggling Crohn’s patients. Had she prefaced her story that this method “worked for her” instead of proclaiming it to be akin to a medical breakthrough for everyone, then I would agree with you. But I think her presumptive approach is dangerous to these other patients who would otherwise benefit from a thought-provoking style of telling the story.

    I face this very same issue when I share my experiences with the Crohn’s drug “Humira.” It has caused me grave side effects which have disabled me and substantially altered the course of my life but I also know that these side effects don’t happen to every Crohn’s patient who takes Humira. In fact, many go into Remission and suffer no side effects. But, as I am aware of the numerous Crohn’s patients who have also gotten gravely ill from Humira, I feel it is important to share my story simply as the “Cautionary Tale.” When doing so, I try to always point this out. By analogy, I think this woman would have come across as greatly contributing to the Crohn’s and IBD worlds had she simply shared her story while acknowledging that it might not work for everyone. Instead, the tone of her Post clearly implies that a patient can use his or her own mind to heal themselves of Crohn’s Disease. THAT is what I found irresponsible about the Post.

    Given my experiences with Humira and the high media visibility its manufacturer, Abbott Laboratories, continues to take despite numerous severe Side Effect warnings it receives from the FDA, I am skeptical of ANYONE who claims they have a CURE for Crohn’s disease because its apparent “incurability” makes it an easy target for manipulation and exploitation. To that end, it is my personal belief (and FEAR) that the FDA might have approved some Biologics sooner than they usually approve other drugs because of this “incurability” along with Abbott’s likely claim that Humira could help some or many Crohn’s patients. Well, since that discussion must have taken place, Humira has helped many patients but it has also harmed some, or many. To that end, I worry when I come across Cures for Crohn’s Disease especially when they are couched in an “absolute” term – as is the case with this Australian woman’s Post.

    More specifically, she wrote:

    “What became abundantly clear to me was that how we ‘think’ creates chemical reactions in the body. This in turn affects and can damage the cells within us. With no stress, the immune system works extremely well. By practicing acceptance, which prevents all stress, I got through breast cancer, skin cancer, and both my brothers dying of cancer. With each of these tests, the so-called incurable Crohn’s disease never returned.” … “Change your mind and you change your life.”

    All of what she wrote is GREAT FOR HER but how does she know that it will translate to other people? She doesn’t; yet she’s almost making fun of Crohn’s patients who don’t “get” this. I happen to think she (and you) is right about the connection of mind and body but it has not worked for me on MANY occasions and I remember how depressed I became and I don’t want to see other Crohn’s patients go through the same thing.

    I appreciate you opening up my mind again to the possibilities of the role of the mind-body connection in treating Crohn’s. But I did not appreciate it coming from a woman in Australia who was essentially mocking all other treatments. In that regard, let’s agree to disagree on this issue.

  3. I have always been one of those dieting articles mistakes that people make, it would probably seem a dubious weight-loss path.
    Today dieting articles I stood in McDonalds, having gone in there to get a friend or family
    member to be your active weight loss” partner”. Anyway, that’s the update on dieting articles this blog. He called them” water-cooler diets. Why don’t
    you try eating healthy and put in that commitment to
    exercise.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>