Patient Tips re: Pain Management Medicine

This Blog Post is the third in a 3-Part Series on the Practice of Pain Medicine from a Patient's Perspective.

This Blog Post is the third in a 3-Part Series on the Practice of Pain Medicine from a Patient’s Perspective.

I find this medical specialty uniquely interesting because it is experienced by patients with all sorts of different diseases, ailments and pains yet there is still no objective manner in which to describe or chronicle “Pain.”  Trying to “codify” a “Pain Scale” is like trying to devise a “Scale of Good-Looking-Ness” for an online Dating Site. My pain of a “9” may only be a pain of a “4” for you just like I may find a woman to be a “10” whom you deem to be a “5.”  (If she’s smart, quick and funny, I’m sorry, but that adds to the total!)  The subjective nature of this very common chronic pain problem combined with its often even more worrisome solution involving prescription narcotics makes Pain Medicine a challenging endeavor for BOTH patients and healthcare professionals.  For this reason, I decided to share my knowledge of, and experience with, Pain Management, by way of this 3-Part Series in the hope that others, i.e., patients AND healthcare professionals, will be better equipped to handle the inherent challenges I’ve encountered, which I am sure are also experienced by MANY others.

To that end, Part 3 of the Series is comprised of “Patient Tips” addressing each of the above-referenced five (5) questions.  As I’ve had to change Pain Management doctors a few times due to “life” circumstances such as changes in my health insurance, relocation for a new job, my doctor retiring, etc., I thought sharing the lessons I’ve learned from each experience would be helpful. I’ve also come up against extraordinary difficulties interacting with this medical specialty in various hospital settings, whether it was a planned hospitalization or an unpredictable one.  Rather than write about these different perspectives, I’ve decided to TELL YOU about them in the below five (5) short videos.

In case you missed Parts 1 or 2 of this Series on Pain Management, please go back and read: Part 1 – “What to look for in a Pain Management Physician;” and Part 2 – “The Pain Medication Agreement” – the Devil’s in the Details.”  In any event, thank you for your interest and I look forward to any constructive feedback.  Again, thanks for reading and watching.

Video 1 – The importance of Communication & Candor in the Pain Management Doctor-Patient relationship.

This 6-minute Video details the importance of Communication and Candor in the Doctor-Patient relationship within the medical specialty of Pain Management.

Video 2 – How to change your Pain Management Physician

This 7-minute Video explains the challenges involved with changing Pain Management Physicians and details the importance of precise, ongoing Preparation in executing such a change.

Video 3 – The Mutual Evaluation Process in finding a NEW Pain Management Physician

This 7-minute Video explains and shares anecdotal evidence concerning the challenges involved with finding a NEW Pain Management Physician and details the Mutual Evaluation Process which must go on between Doctor and Patient.

Video 4 – Patient Tips on using the Pain Management Service in the Hospital

This 9-minute Video explains and shares anecdotal evidence regarding the challenges involved with getting reasonable pain relief via the “Pain Service” inside hospitals for both “planned” (i.e., Hip Replacement Surgery) and “unpredictable” hospitalizations (i.e., a severe Crohn’s Disease flare-up involving an obstruction).

Video 5 – When your Pain Management Doctor changes your narcotic pain medications, should you relinquish your excess narcotics when asked to do so by your Doctor?

This 4-minute Video explains the dilemmas involved when your Pain Management doctor switches you to a different narcotic pain medication and then asks you to relinquish to his office all of the excess narcotic pain medication you have in your possession from the previous narcotic medication you were using.

Please share your comments or experiences regarding interactions with Pain Management Physicians or Pain Medicine. Thank you.

Please share your comments or experiences regarding interactions with Pain Management Physicians or Pain Medicine. Thank you.

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